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White Fricassee

Cut a pair of chickens into pieces, as for carving; and wash them through 2 or three waters. Then lay them in a large pan, sprinkle them lightly with salt, and fill up the pan with boiling water. Cover it and let the chickens stand for half an hour. Then put them immediatly into a stew-pan; adding a few blades of mace, and a few whole peppercorns, and a handful of celery, split thin and chopped finely; also, a small white onion sliced. Pour on cold milk and water (mixed in equal portions) sufficient to cover the chickens well. Cover the stew-pan, set it over the fire, and let it stew till the chickens are throughly done, and quite tender. While the chickens are stewing, prepare, in a small sauce-pan, a gravy or sauce made as follows: - Mix two tea-spoons of flour with as much cold water as will make it like a batter, and stir it till quite smooth and free from lumps. Then add to it, gradually, half a pint of boiling milk. Next put in a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, cut into small pieces. Set it over hot coals, and stir until it comes to a boil, and the butter is well melted and mixed throughout. Then take it off the fire, and, while it is hot, stir in a glass of madeira or sherry, and four table-spoons of rich cream, and some grated nutmeg. Lastly, take the chickens out of the stew-pan, and pour off all the liquor, &c. Return the chicken to the stew-pan, and pour over it, hot, the above-mentioned gravy. Cover the pan closely, and let it stand in a hot place, or in a kettle of boiling water for ten minutes. Then send it to the table in a covered dish.
To the taste of many persons, this fricassee will be improved by adding to the chicken, while stewing, some small, thin sliced of cold boiled ham.
Rabbits or veal may be fricasseed in the above manner.

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This page contains a single entry from the blog posted on November 12, 2004 9:12 AM.

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