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1847 Lady's Receipt-Book Archives

November 12, 2004

White Fricassee

Cut a pair of chickens into pieces, as for carving; and wash them through 2 or three waters. Then lay them in a large pan, sprinkle them lightly with salt, and fill up the pan with boiling water. Cover it and let the chickens stand for half an hour. Then put them immediatly into a stew-pan; adding a few blades of mace, and a few whole peppercorns, and a handful of celery, split thin and chopped finely; also, a small white onion sliced. Pour on cold milk and water (mixed in equal portions) sufficient to cover the chickens well. Cover the stew-pan, set it over the fire, and let it stew till the chickens are throughly done, and quite tender. While the chickens are stewing, prepare, in a small sauce-pan, a gravy or sauce made as follows: - Mix two tea-spoons of flour with as much cold water as will make it like a batter, and stir it till quite smooth and free from lumps. Then add to it, gradually, half a pint of boiling milk. Next put in a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, cut into small pieces. Set it over hot coals, and stir until it comes to a boil, and the butter is well melted and mixed throughout. Then take it off the fire, and, while it is hot, stir in a glass of madeira or sherry, and four table-spoons of rich cream, and some grated nutmeg. Lastly, take the chickens out of the stew-pan, and pour off all the liquor, &c. Return the chicken to the stew-pan, and pour over it, hot, the above-mentioned gravy. Cover the pan closely, and let it stand in a hot place, or in a kettle of boiling water for ten minutes. Then send it to the table in a covered dish.
To the taste of many persons, this fricassee will be improved by adding to the chicken, while stewing, some small, thin sliced of cold boiled ham.
Rabbits or veal may be fricasseed in the above manner.

November 18, 2004

Molasses Cake

1 cup molasses or cane syrup
1/4 cup butter, cut in pieces
1/2 tablespoon cinnamon
2 small eggs, beaten
1 3/4 cups sifted flour
1/2 teaspoon soda dissolved in small amt of warm water

Take molasses or cane syrup and add butter pieces into a saucepan. Stir over very low heat until butter is soft enough to mix together easily. Then add cinnamon, beaten eggs, and sifted flour. Then after you stir that till most of lumps are out, add in the soda which was dissolved in warm water.
Grease baking pan and bake 350 for 45 minutes.
350 for about 45 minutes
note: recipe cut in half from original

Original recipe
Molasses Cake. - Cut up a quater of a pound of fresh butter unto a pint of West India Molasses. Warm it just sufficiently to soften the butter, and make it mix easily. Stir it well into the molasses and add a tablespoon of powdered cinnamon. Beat three eggs very light and stir them, gradulally into the mixtire, in turn with barely enough of sifted flour (not mroe than a pint and a half) to make it about as thick as a pound-cake batter. Add, at the last, a small or level tea-spoonful of pearlash, or a full one of soda, dissolved in a very little warm water. Butter some small tin cake-pans, or patty-pans, put in the mixture, and set them immediatly into the oven, which must not be toohot, as all cakes made with molasses are peculiarly liable to scorch on the outside.

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Cream Cheese frosting
1 package cream cheese
1 tablespoon milk
3/4 cup powdered sugar
dash cinnamon

Cream the cream cheese, add the powdered sugar and then mix well. Add the milk and test to make sure its sweet enough, if not you can add more powdered sugar till desired. Then add dash of cinnamon and spread on cooled Molasses cake.

November 21, 2004

Strawberry Cakes

Cakes
4 1/2 cups flour
2 sticks butter
3 eggs
2 tablespoons sugar

Strawberry Filling
2 cups strawberries
1 cup

Icing
4 cups powdered sugar
4 egg whites

Take flour and cut butter into it, until it resembles a crumbly texture. Beat eggs in separate bowl. Add into eggs the sugar, mixing well. Add egg mixture to flour mixture. If mixture seems very stiff add a little cold water. Knead dough until it is no longer sticky. Roll dough out onto floured surface, into a thick sheet. Use a biscuit cutter or glass to cut circles out of the dough, dipping utensil into flour so as not to stick. Butter baking sheets, laying the cakes on it, but leaving maybe an inch apart or so. Preheat oven to 425 and bake until light brown*. Original recipe said bake in brisk oven.

*Not sure on the temperature of the oven, but I am guessing a rather hot oven since these are very biscuit - like I think -, and many recipes that called for brisk oven were biscuit like or pie like. Once I try these I'll update my oven figure if needed. If you try this recipe and find a better oven temp please let me know on the tagboard! Or if you know what general temp is a "brisk oven" hehe

Now mash the strawberries and add the sugar. Reserve some strawberries whole to add to the top of the cakes.
Once the cakes are cool half them. Add a generous amount of the mashed strawberry mixture to the bottom of the half. Cover with the top piece and press it down slightly. To make the icing beat the egg whites till foamy. Then add the powdered sugar a small amount at a time and beat well after each addition of powdered sugar. Then ice the sides and top with icing. Before icing has dried add some whole strawberries, one large one in the center and then smaller ones around it forming a circle.

Original Recipe:
Strawberry Cakes. - Sift a small quart of flour into a pan, and cut up among it half a pound of the best fresh butter; or mix in a pint of butter if it is soft enough to measure in that manner. Rub with your hands the butter into the flour, till the whole is crumbled fine. Beat three eggs very light; and then mix with them three table-spoonfuls of powdered loaf-sugar. Wet the flour and butter with the beaten egg and sugar, so as to form a dough. If you find it too stiff, add a very little cold water. Knead the dough till it quits your hands, and leaves them clean. Spread some flour on your paste-board, and roll out the dough into a rather thick sheet. Cut it into round cakes with the edge of a tumbler, or something similar; dipping the cutter frequently into flour to prevent its sticking. Butter some large square iron pans or baking sheets. lay the cakes in, not too close to each other. Set them in a brisk oven, and bake them light brown. have ready a sufficient quantity of ripe strawberries, mashed and made very sweet with powdered white sugar. Reserve some of your finest strawberries whole. Reserve some of your finest strawberries whole. When the cakes are cool, split them, place them on flat dishes and cover the bottom piece of each with mashed strawberry, put on thickly. Then lay on the top pieces, pressing them down. Have ready some icing, and spread it thickly over the top and down the sides of each cake, so as to enclose both the upper and lower pieces. before the icing has quite dried ornament the top of every cake with the whole strawberries, a large one in the centre, and the smaller ones placed round in a close circle.
These are delicious and beautiful cakes if properly make. The strawberries, not being cooked, will retain all their natural flavour. Instead of strawberries you may use raspberries. The large white or buff-coloured raspberry is the finest, if to be eaten uncooked.

November 24, 2004

Connecticut Sausage Meat

A scaled down recipe:
2 lbs ground pork
3 1/4 teaspoons sage
2 1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 teaspoon brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/3 teaspoon cayenne
optional: 1/4 cup pure maple syrup

Mix spices together and then add pork, then syrup if using. You can make into patties and then freeze. Fry in the usual manner.

Original Recipe:
To fifteen pounds of the lean of fresh pork, allow five pounds of the fat. Having removed the skin, sinews, and gristle, chop both the fat and lean as fine as possible, and mix them well together. Rub to a powder sufficient sage-leaves to make four ounces when done. Mix the sage with three ounces of fine salt, two ounces of brown sugar, an ounce of powdered black pepper, and a quarter of an ounce of cayenne. Add this seasoning to the chopped pork, and mix it thoroughly. Pack the sausage-meat down, hard and closely, into stone jars, which must be kept in a cool place, and well covered. When wanted for use, make some of it into small, flat cakes, dredge them with flour, and fry them well. The fat that exudes from the sausage-cakes, while frying, will be sufficient to cook them in.

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About 1847 Lady's Receipt-Book

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