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Sauces & Gravies Archives

November 11, 2004

Cajun Gravy

4 tablspoon butter
1/2 cup minced onion
1/3 cup minced celery
1/3 cup green pepper
2 minced cloves or garlic
1/2 cup flour
2 15 oz cand of chicken broth or 1 qt of homemade chicken stock
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon chili flakes
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
salt

In a medium saucepan, saute onion, celery, and green pepper in butter of moderate heat until the onions are translucent. Add garlic and flour and mix until well incorperated. Continue to cook over moderate heat, stirring frequently, until the mixture is a light brown color, which takes about 5 minutes. Add 1 cup of stock or broth and bring to a boil, stirring constantly with a whisk. Add remaining stock or broth and bring to a boil stirring constantly. Add bay leaf, chili flakes, and black pepper. Let simmer for 10 minutes, stirring frequently. If a thicker gravy is desired, simply let boil and reduce slightly. Add salt if needed.

November 22, 2004

Melted Butter

Sometimes Called Drawn Butter.
MELTED butter is the foundation of most of the common sauces. Have a covered sauce-pan for this purpose. One lined with porcelain will be best. Take a quarter of a pound of the best butter, cut it up, and mix with it about two tea-spoonfuls of flour. When it is thoroughly mixed, put it into the sauce-pan, and add to it four table-spoonfuls of cold water. Cover the sauce-pan, and set it in a large tin pan of boiling water. Shake it round continually (always moving it the same way) till it is entirely melted and begins to simmer. Then let it rest till it boils up.
If you set it on hot coals, or over the fire, it will be oily.
If the butter and flour is not well mixed it will be lumpy.
If you put too much water, it will be thin and poor. All these defects are to be carefully avoided.
In melting butter for sweet or pudding sauce, you may use milk instead of water.

Cranberry Sauce

Wash a quart of ripe cranberries, and put them into a pan with about a wine-glass of water. Stew them slowly, and stir them frequently, particularly after they begin to burst. They require a great deal of stewing, and should be like a marmalade when done. Just before you take them from the fire, stir in a pound of brown sugar.
When they are thoroughly done, put them into a deep dish, and set them away to get cold.
You may strain the pulp through a cullender or sieve into a mould, and when it is in a firm shape send it to table on a glass dish. Taste it when it is cold, and if not sweet enough, add more sugar.Cranberries require more sugar than any other fruit, except plums.
Cranberry sauce is eaten with roast turkey, roast fowls, and roast ducks.

October 14, 2005

BEEF-GRAVY

.... or Brown Sauce for Ragout, Game, Poultry, Fish, &c.

If you want gravy immediately, see Potato Soup, or Glaze. If you have time enough, furnish a thick and well-tinned stewpan with a thin slice of salt pork, or an ounce of butter, and a middling-sized onion; on this lay a pound of nice, juicy gravy beef, (as the object in making gravy is to extract the nutritious succulence of the meat, it must be beaten to comminute the containing vessels, and scored to augment the surface to the action of the water); cover the stewpan, and set it on a slow fire; when the meat begins to brown, turn it about, and let it get slightly browned (but take care it is not at all burned): then pour in a pint and a half of boiling water; set the pan on the fire; when it boils, carefully catch the scum, and then put in a crust of bread toasted brown (don't burn it) a sprig of winter savory, or lemon thyme and parsley--a roll of thin cut lemon-peel, a dozen berries of allspice, and a dozen of black pepper. Cover the stewpan close, and let it stew very gently for about two hours, then strain it through a sieve into a basin. Now, if you wish to thicken it, set a clean stewpan over a slow fire, with about an ounce of butter in it; when it is melted, dredge to it, by degrees, as much flour as will dry it up, stirring them well together; when thoroughly mixed, pour in a little gravy--stir it well together, and add the remainder by degrees; set it over the fire, let it simmer gently for fifteen minutes longer, skim off the fat, &c. as it rises; when it is about as thick as cream, squeeze it through a tamis or fine sieve--and you will have a fine rich Brown Sauce, at a very moderate expense, and without much trouble.

-Taken from The Cook's Own Book 1832

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This page contains an archive of all entries posted to Hearth and Home in the Sauces & Gravies category. They are listed from oldest to newest.

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