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November 10, 2004

Creamed Potatoes

6 med potatoes, peeled, & cubed to 1/2 inches
3 tablespoons buter
1/4 cup flour
1 teasoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 cups milk
paprika
parsley
creole seasoning

Bring to a boil the potatoes, reduce heat, cover and cook for 15-20 mins. Melt butter in saucepan. Stir in flour, salt, & pepper until smooth. Gradually add milk. Then bring mixture to a boil stirring for 2 mins or until thick.
Drain potatoes & place in serving dish. Pour sauce over potatoes & toss gently. Sprinkle paprika, creole seasoning, and parsley on top of potatoes.

October 17, 2005

DIRECTIONS for procuring the best...Potatoes

Potatoes, take rank for universal use, profit and easy acquirement. The smooth skin, known by the name of Howe's Potatoe, is the most mealy and richest flavor'd; the yellow rusticoat next best; the red, and red rusticoat are tolerable; and the yellow Spanish have their value - those cultivated from imported seed on sandy or dry loomy lands, are best for table use; though the red or either will produce more in rich, loomy, highly manured garden grounds; new lands and a sandy soil, afford the richest flavor'd; and most mealy Potatoe much depends on the ground on which they grow - more on the species of Potatoes planted - and still more from foreign seeds - and each may be known by attention to connoisseurs; for a good Potatoe comes up in many branches of cookery, as herein after prescribed.---All Potatoes should be dug before the rainy seasons in the fall, well dryed in the sun, kept from frost and dampness during the winter, in the spring removed from the cellar to a dry loft, and spread thin, and frequently stirred and dried, or they will grow and be thereby injured for cookery.
A roast Potatoe is brought on with roast Beef, a Stake, a Chop, or Fricassee; good boiled with a boiled dish; make an excellent stuffing for a turkey, water or wild fowl; make a good pie, and a good starch for many uses. All potatoes run out or depreciate in America; a fresh importation of the Spanish might restore them to table use.
It would swell this treatise too much to say every thing that is useful to prepare a good table, but I may be pardoned by observing, that the Irish have preserved a genuine mealy rich Potatoe, for a century, which takes rank of any known in any other kingdom; and I have heard that they renew their seed by planting and cultivating the Seed Ball, which grows on the vine. The manner of their managing it to keep up the excellency of that root, would better suit a treatise on agriculture and gardening than this - and be inserted in a book which would be read by the farmer, instead of his amiable daughter. If no one treats on the subject, it may appear in the next edition.

November 1, 2005

New England Beet Hash

bt-hash.jpg

AKA Red Flannel Hash

1/2 package sliced bacon
2 or 3 medium/large potatoes cubed small
2 cans beets, drained and chopped fine
1 small onion chopped fine
salt and pepper to taste

Boil potatoes till just before done. Drain and then set aside. Fry bacon till done. Set off onto paper to drain. If there is excess grease pour off grease into a cup. Saute onion. Now add potatoes and fry a little, add more bacon grease or butter if needed. I take the can from the beets and use it to chop the beets very fine. Now add beets to potatoes and onions. Next add bacon, crumbled, and fry a little until all is mixed in well together.You may need to add more grease, thus use it from what you drained off into the cup or butter. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Note: This recipe was given to me by my grandmother, though she used hamburger. I recall my mom making it with bacon, but you can use corned beef or hamburger {though I don't think hamburger is very tasty} for this recipe.

January 7, 2010

Shrimp Stuffed Bell Peppers

stfd-bell-ppr.jpg

I became inspired when I ran across a recipe in the "New Southern Cook Book" of 1906 called Crabs or Shrimp Baked in Bell Pepper. However, the set of seasonings just isn't what would go well for our family. Plus stuffed peppers just have to have rice! So I put a little this and that and came up with the following recipe:

5 bell peppers, whole
1 bell pepper, diced
1 small onion, diced
2 small stalks celery, diced
1 tablespoon garlic, minced
1 2/3 cups rice, cooked
1/4th cup +2 tablespoons breadcrumbs
1 tablespoon Parmesan Cheese
1 lb shrimp, cleaned
2 tablespoons chicken broth
about 3 tablespoons butter
Creole Seasoning
Tabasco
Italian Seasoning
Salt & Pepper

Take 5 bell peppers and cut the tops off and remove seeds from inside. Place in casserole dish and set aside. In about 1 or 2 tablespoons butter saute bell pepper, onions, celery, and garlic until tender. Remove veggies from skillet and into a large bowl. Now add shrimp to skillet with about 1 tablespoon butter and sprinkle a dash of creole seasoning and Tabasco sauce. Saute until just done. Cut shrimp into smaller pieces. Now add shrimp and remaining butter, if any, into bowl with veggies. To this add 5 tablespoons of breadcrumbs, all of the rice, Parmesan cheese, creole seasoning {about 1/2 - 1 teaspoon for mild}, a couple dashes of Italian Seasoning and salt and pepper to taste. Next, add about two tablespoons of chicken broth to the mixture. Mix well. Then stuff the five peppers. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon breadcrumbs over the top. In addition you could also sprinkle with Parmesan Cheese if desired. Cook in oven at 350 for about 20 - 25 minutes, or until bell peppers are tender to your liking.

Note: I cooked mine for 35 minutes and they still came out a little firm for my tastes, so I think next time I will set them in salted boiling water for about 10 minutes before stuffing them and placing them in the oven. I also think crab would have been a nice addition if I had had any.

Here is the original recipe if your interested - Crabs or Shrimp Baked in Bell Pepper - Use one dozen bell peppers, one quart of picked shrimps, one teacupful of grated breadcrumbs, two tablespoonfuls of butter, one teaspoonful of mixed mustard, one-fourth teaspoonful of pepper, one-eighth teaspoonful of celery seed, one egg, salt, grating of nutmeg. Cut the stem end from the peppers; cut out the seed and veins; soak the peppers half hour in cold water. Cream the butter; add the egg and seasonings; next add the crumbs. Mix these ingredients well and add to the shrimps. Drain the peppers, stuff with the mixture, arrange in a pan open side up. Cook twenty minutes in a hot oven. Crabs may be prepared the same way. Serve as a fish course at dinner.--Miss Parloa

Enjoy the old fashioned way of things? Interested in the Victorian era? If so have a browse around our other site A Victorian Passage. Updated Regularly!

About Veggies

This page contains an archive of all entries posted to Hearth and Home in the Veggies category. They are listed from oldest to newest.

Sweet Breads is the previous category.

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